You are here

Rapid Evidence Assessment

Share

The default top banner

What Works for Kids (WW4K) is Australia’s key online database and discussion forum for researchers, practitioners and policy-makers working to improve child and youth wellbeing. Originally funded by the Australian Government Department of Social Services, WW4K is part of ARACY’s flagship initiative, The Nest, a national action plan to mobilise, align and enable the efforts of those working to improve the wellbeing of Australia’s children and youth (0–24 years). The Nest responds to the enormity of the task by providing a high-level cooperative agenda for national action, with a focus on ‘what maters’, ‘what works’ and ‘how are we doing’. 

WW4K reveals ‘what works’, providing service providers, practitioners and funders in the government, philanthropic and not-for-profit sector with the latest information about the best evidence-based interventions. In turn, this allows decision-makers to make informed investment choices.

Rapid Evidence Assessment (REA)

Rating

Criteria

Well supported

  • No evidence of risk or harm.
  • If there have been multiple studies, the overall evidence supports the benefit of the program.
  • Clear baseline and post-measurement of outcomes for both conditions.
  • At least two RCTs have found the program to be significantly more effective than comparison group. Effect was maintained for at least one study at one-year follow-up.

Supported

  • No evidence of risk or harm.
  • If there have been multiple studies, the overall evidence supports the benefit of the program.
  • Clear baseline and post-measurement of outcomes for both conditions.
  • At least one RCT has found the program to be significantly more effective than comparison group. Effect was maintained at 6-month follow-up.

Promising

  • No evidence of risk or harm.
  • If there have been multiple studies, the overall evidence supports the benefit of the program.
  • Clear baseline and post-measurement of outcomes for both conditions.
  • At least one study using some form of contemporary comparison group demonstrated some improvement outcomes for the intervention but not the comparison group.

Emerging

 

  • No evidence of risk or harm.
  • There is insufficient evidence demonstrating the program’s effect on outcomes because:
    • the designs are not sufficiently rigorous (i.e. they do not meet the criteria of the above programs), or
    • the results of rigorous studies are not yet available.

Adapted from Parenting Research Centre, 2012.

REA Ratings are approved by Professor John Toumborou and Associate Professor Sophie Havighurst on behalf of ARACY Prevention Science Network (PSN).